Biafran Soldiers Killed Thousands: The Genocide In Calabar & More

Eversince – the rhetoric regarding the civil war has been heavily one sided. The Igbo people claim that they are the ‘only’ casualties of the civil war.

However, an old employee of the eastern government in the 60’s has recounted how Biafran soldiers killed, maimed and buried bodies of the inhabitants of Calabar.

Qoute:

You Calabar people say you want a state of your own. Let me tell you that by the time the Federal Troops come here to enforce the mad idea there will be no one left but grass and weeds, for we shall have flatened your land and killed all you Efiks.

Besides the confession of this employee, we have supporting evidence regarding the inhumane treatment of minority groups under Biafra’s territories.

These are issue’s the Igbo people and IPOB need to answer. If they so love and are loved by the Calabar’s, Igala’s and Idoma’s – Why did they murder them ?

Evidence continues to proove that the Biafran project is nothing but a proxy to access the wealth of the oil rich territories of the Niger-Delta and subdue the minorities of the Federal Republic.

Qoutes:

while ojukwu was planning his secession …. he and his collaborators carried out unprecendented acts of terrorism and intimidation agains the innocent minority people of the Calabar, Ogoja, and Rivers fro wanting their own states.

It was against this background that minority leaders in diff erent regions formed movements that started agitating for the creation of more states where their interests could be adequately protected. Some of the major movements that were formed before independence included the Calabar-Ogoja-River (COR) State Movement in the Eastern Region, the Mid-West State Movement in the Western Region, and the Middle-Belt State Movement in the Northern Region.

That was obviously the immediate objective but the long term goal of the minority leaders in state creation was to liberate the minorities from majority dominance.

William Norris of the London Times who visited Biafra, also reported an eye?witness account in which some men of Ibibio ethnic origin were beaten to death at Umuahia on April 2, 1968.

According to Ikpeme, the Igbo leadership, who did not like the minority agitation, decided either to force the fi ve million non-Igbo minorities into the new republic or eliminate them. It was on this basis, claims Ikpeme, that Biafran soldiers were quickly sent to the minority areas to “keep down the people, detain or even kill all who dared raise a voice in protest against the idea of Biafra.

Violence towards the minorities was not perpetrated only by the Biafran troops. The federal troops were equally culpable of this crime

He asserted that no fewer than six thousand Rivers people were sent to diff erent refugee camps in Igboland.

Omaka, Arua Oko. “The Forgotten Victims: Ethnic Minorities in the Nigeria-Biafra War, 1967-1970.” Journal of Retracing Africa: Vol. 1, Issue 1 (2014): 25-40.
Mwakikagile, G. (2001). Ethnic politics in Kenya and Nigeria. Huntington, NY: Nova Science Publishers.

 Biafran Soldiers Killed Thousands: The Genocide In Calabar & More
Biafran Soldiers Killed Thousands: The Genocide In Calabar & More
 Biafran Soldiers Killed Thousands: The Genocide In Calabar & More
Biafran Soldiers Killed Thousands: The Genocide In Calabar & More
 Biafran Soldiers Killed Thousands: The Genocide In Calabar & More
Biafran Soldiers Killed Thousands: The Genocide In Calabar & More
 Biafran Soldiers Killed Thousands: The Genocide In Calabar & More
Biafran Soldiers Killed Thousands: The Genocide In Calabar & More

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